Free Rabies Vaccination Clinic – Jan. 20 for Dogs & Cats

Protect your pet (and your community)! Saturday, January 20, 2018

Montgomery Fire Company #2 New Location! 

Located at 529 Route 518 in Blawenburg

DOGS:  9:00 am – 10:30 am

CATS:   10:30 am-12:00 noon

Dog & Cat licenses will also be available for purchase that day:
  • $20 for a neutered dog, $23 for non-neutered dog,
  • $10 for a neutered cat; $15 for a non-neutered cat
  • cash or check please.
For Safety’s sake
Please, no children under age 7.
Dogs must be on a short, sturdy leash—No retractable leashes!
Use of a soft muzzle is encouraged.
Dogs must be under control of an adult at all times.
Cats must be in a carrier

For more information, call Montgomery Township Animal Control 908-359-8211 x247

Radon Awareness Month – Test Kits Available

The Montgomery Township Health Department is working with the Greater Somerset Public Health Partnership (GSPHP) to recognize January as Radon Awareness Month.

Radon is an odorless, tasteless and invisible gas that occurs naturally in soil. It is released from the natural decay of the elements uranium, thorium and radium, and occurs in higher concentrations in certain areas of the state, including Somerset County.

Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers and the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. Radon is associated with 15,000 to 22,000 lung cancer deaths each year in the United States.

“In an effort to reduce the risk of exposure to radon gas, residents are urged to test their homes,” said Stephanie Carey, Health Officer of Montgomery Township.  “It’s not uncommon to find that homes on the same block will have different test results. Even if your neighbor’s home is not affected by radon gas, it does not mean that your home is in an acceptable range.”

Starting on Monday, January 2, to help residents to test their homes, one radon kit per household will be available on a first-come, first-served basis for $10 at the Montgomery Township Health Department.  Radon kits may be picked up at the Montgomery Township Health Department, 2261 Route 206, Belle Mead while supplies last.

For more information on radon testing or mitigation, contact the Montgomery Health Department at (908) 359-8211.

Flu Season is here – Did you get your flu shot yet?

Flu Season is here – Did you get your flu shot yet?

 

Free Flu Vaccination Clinic

Thursday, December 14, 5PM to 8PM, Otto Kaufman Community Center

 Vaccinating ages 4 to 104 (under 18 must be accompanied by parent)  

Walk-ins are welcome, but for faster service, make an appointment.  Call the Health Department at 908-359-8211, x 227 or email health@twp.montgomery.nj.us

It’s time to share– time with family, presents—and germs! Protect your family from the flu, in time for the Holidays!

The Centers for Disease Control recommends vaccination against influenza for all people over 6 months of age.  The flu shot protects you and those around you.  Flu can be especially serious in seniors, young children, pregnant women, and people with conditions like asthma and diabetes.

The Health Department is giving the quadrivalent flu vaccine which does not contain preservatives, including thimerosal. The vaccine is called quadrivalent because it offers protection against four different  flu virus strains that research shows will be most common during this flu season: two influenza A virus strains and two influenza B virus strains.

The flu shot is Free to residents of Montgomery, and the Boroughs of Hopewell, Pennington, and Rocky Hill; first responders; Municipal/District employees, and Medicare recipients.  Free-will donations accepted.

Public Hearing to Prevent Youth Access to Electronic Smoking Devices in Town

Prevent Lyme Disease Press Release

May is Tick-borne Disease Awareness Month

Montgomery Twp., NJ — A growing number of Montgomery Twp. Residents are falling ill with diseases spread by ticks, such as Lyme disease and anaplasmosis. These tick-borne diseases are preventable if you take action to stay safe while enjoying the outdoors now, and in the warmer months ahead.

In New Jersey, the most commonly infected tick is the deer tick (or black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis). “After a mild winter, tick populations are surging and that could mean a bad year for Lyme Disease. During the spring, ticks are active and looking to feed on people or pets. The trouble is, these ticks can be as small as a poppy seed, so we all need to be aware of the risks and take action to protect ourselves.” said Stephanie Carey, Health Officer for Montgomery Twp. Health Department.

Anyone who is bitten by a tick carrying the bacteria can become infected. People who spend a lot of time outdoors in tick-infested areas from April through October are at greatest risk. Proper removal of a tick from the skin within 48 hours of being bitten can reduce the risk of infection.

The Health Department encourages residents to follow these three simple steps to avoid tick-borne diseases:

REPEL – Before you go outside, apply an EPA-registered insect repellent (such as DEET). Treat your clothes with permethrin. Wear light-colored long sleeved shirts and long pants, and tuck your pants into your socks. Inspect yourself regularly when outside to catch any ticks before they attach.

INSPECT – Do daily tick checks on yourself, your children and pets. Check yourself from head to toe.

REMOVE – Remove ticks promptly. Showering within two hours of coming indoors is also effective to wash ticks off the skin.

If you were bitten by a tick – watch for early signs of disease during the weeks following the bite. The first sign of Lyme disease is often an expanding red rash at the site of the tick bite. The rash usually appears seven to 14 days after the tick bite, but sometimes it takes up to 30 days to appear. Not everyone gets the rash, so be on the lookout for additional symptoms of early Lyme disease: fatigue, headache, fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, and muscle and joint pain. Early signs of anaplasmosis are fever, muscle pain and malaise. Both diseases can be successfully treated with antibiotics, especially if treatment is given early.

Get more tips and information for reducing your risk of tick bites, download tick-identification cards, see how to safely remove a tick, at health.montgomery.nj.us.

For health news, alerts and information – visit www.health.montgomery.nj.us or call (908) 359-8211.

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month

The Montgomery Township Health Department and the Morris-Somerset Regional Chronic Disease Coalition (RCDC), along with its partners, are encouraging residents to play it safe and protect themselves from the harmful rays of the sun, beginning this season and throughout the year.

A proclamation declaring May as Skin Cancer Awareness month was presented at the April 25 Somerset County freeholders’ meeting.

“Skin cancer is the most common of all cancers. It is vital that we understand that anyone can get skin cancer regardless of skin color or age,” said Freeholder Patricia L. Walsh, public health and safety liaison. “Recent studies indicate that sun damage in childhood can lead to skin cancer later in life, so you are never too young to protect yourself from sun exposure.”

“Skin cancer is a serious public health concern.  Every year, more than five million Americans are treated for skin cancer. This year alone, more than 10,000 deaths in the U.S. will be caused by melanoma skin cancer,” she said.  “We are urging residents to avoid artificial tanning, to conduct self-exams and to get screened. Melanoma is highly treatable when caught early.”

The RCDC is encouraging skin cancer awareness through a number of initiatives, programs and screenings throughout both counties.  An interactive May skin cancer awareness calendar with sun safety tips, screening locations and partner resources is available at http://bit.ly/MelanomaHD.  Dates with an orange star open to tips on how to protect yourself and your family as well as screening information and available resources.

An information table with skin cancer resources, screening information and copies of the calendar will be in the lobby of the Somerset County Administration Building at 20 Grove St., Somerville throughout the month of May. For ongoing information about programs offered by the Somerset County Department of Health, go to http://bit.ly/SCHealthDept and follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SCHealthDept.

We also are supporting our coalition partner the Enright Melanoma Foundation, a New Jersey-based nonprofit organization, whose mission is to raise sun-safety awareness and help prevent melanoma through education and early detection.

Residents are encouraged to become Enright Sun Safety Certified™. Designed by skin-care professionals from the Enright Melanoma Foundation, programs are free, online education courses for ages 5 and over that take about 15 minutes to complete.  Once finished a certificate of completion can be printed. The programs can be found at www.ApplyCoverEnjoy.org.

The Morris-Somerset Regional Chronic Disease Coalition, under the auspices of the Somerset County Department of Health, is made possible by a grant from the New Jersey Office of Cancer Control and Prevention.  For more information, to become a member or to learn more about available cancer resources, screening locations, dates, times and eligibility, contact RCDC Public Health Consultant Lucille Y-Talbot at (908) 203-6077, ytalbot@co.somerset.nj.us or visit http://bit.ly/RCDCSC.

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In the Blink of an Eye: A Conversation about Stress, Anxiety, Drugs & Alcohol in our Community

In the Blink of an Eye – Thursday, April 20, 2017. 

A Conversation about Stress, Anxiety, Drugs & Alcohol in our Community

 

Join the Conversation! 

Submit your question for our panel: http://www.mtsd.k12.nj.us/blink 

Panel includes:

  • Moderator – School District Superintendent Nancy Gartenberg
  • Captain Thomas Wain (Montgomery Township Police Department)
  • Dr. Bert Mandelbaum (Montgomery Township School District Physician)
  • Somerset County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Experts and Advocates from the Recovery Community

Community Faith Leaders, Mental Health providers and Community Partners will also be available to answer any of your questions or requests for additional support and resources.