COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing at RVCC on May 5 and 7

BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

There is still an opportunity for Somerset and Hunterdon County residents to get tested.

The COVID-19 testing site at Raritan Valley Community College, located at 118 Lamington Rd, will be open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, May 5, and Thursday, May 7.

Testing, which is free of charge, is available to Hunterdon and Somerset County residents, age five (5) and older. Because priority is being given to those who are exhibiting symptoms of the coronavirus, residents must have a valid doctor’s prescription, ID and an appointment to receive testing.

Patients are required to provide a copy of their prescription, either by bringing it with them to the testing site, or by sending it via email in advance of the appointment.  Patients or their physicians, can send the written authorization to the Somerset County Department of Health at coronavirus@co.somerset.nj.us, with the word “Prescription” in the subject line. Faxes can be sent to 908-704-8042.

Patients must schedule an appointment for testing at https://somerset-hunterdon.adlabscovidtest.com or by calling 908-237-7150.

Additional dates will be offered based on availability of resources. Check www.co.somerset.nj.us/covid19status for updates.

Anyone who does not have an appointment and a valid prescription or written order from their physician will be turned away.

For the safety, health and security of staff and volunteers, patients must arrive by car. The testing site will not allow entry if residents don’t arrive in a vehicle, even if they have a valid driver’s license and prescription. When coming to the testing center, residents are asked to use the main entrance to the college campus, off of Route 28.

For more information, contact coronavirus@co.somerset.nj.us.

 

GOOGLE MAP OF RVCC:

 

Source: Somerset County Office of Public Information

Emergency Preparedness Plan and Surge Nursing

Montgomery Township Health Department is currently working on updating our preparedness plans and we want to make sure proper procedures are in place for infectious disease outbreaks in the event we need to activate our Emergency Preparedness Plan.

We are looking for additional Registered Nurses to handle things like answer incoming phone calls, screen patients, and vaccinate the community in the event of a pandemic.  We encourage Nurses who live in or work near Montgomery Township to be a part of our Surge Nursing Team.

Click here for the flyer with additional details.

If you are interested, please contact Brianna McKenna at BMcKenna@twp.montgomery.nj.us for more information.

 

 

Fight the Flu!

It’s not too late to get a flu vaccine to protect yourself and your loved ones this flu season!

If you haven’t received your flu shot yet, call (908) 359-8211, ext. 235 to schedule an appointment to receive your flu shot.

January Is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

Regular Screenings and HPV Vaccine May Save Your Life

Following the medical guidelines for routine screening of cervical cancer is important.

Post Date:01/22/2020

The Morris-Somerset Regional Chronic Disease Coalition (RCDC) are urging women to take advantage of potentially life-saving screenings and immunizations that can significantly decrease one’s risk of developing cervical cancer.

Although cervical cancer is most prevalent in women age 30 years and over, all women are at risk. Early detection of cervical cancer through regular screening via a Pap test and/or HPV test is critical since it can increase your chance of survival if diagnosed and treated promptly.

What are Pap and HPV tests?
A Pap test finds abnormal cells that may turn into cancer if not treated, while an HPV test detects the human papillomavirus.   HPV is a precursor for cervical cancer but is preventable by getting the HPV vaccine.  In fact, 93% of women survive after receiving a diagnosis of early-stage cervical cancer, which shows the importance of regular screening.

It is recommended that women get a Pap test every three years beginning at age 21. From ages 30 to 65 years, women should continue with regular Pap tests but can go as long as five years between tests if combined with a test for HPV.

Routine screening is important
Following the medical guidelines for routine screening of cervical cancer is important, because women who have early-stage cervical cancer often do not have symptoms.  Abnormal vaginal bleeding, unusual vaginal discharge and pain during sex are all signs that a woman may have advanced-stage cervical cancer. Although these symptoms may be an indication of other conditions, if women are urged to consult with a healthcare provider as soon as possible if they ever experience any of these.

Receiving an HPV vaccination is the best way to prevent infections caused by the HPV virus, which leads to the majority (90%) of all cervical cancer cases in the United States.  While HPV can be transmitted through sexual contact, it is recommended that boys and girls at age 11 and 12 receive the vaccination long before they are exposed, and while their immune response is high.  Talk to your healthcare provider about the benefits of receiving the HPV vaccine.

Practice healthy habits
Lifestyle can also factor into your risk of cervical cancer. Practicing good health habits, like not smoking, eating a diet high in fruits and veggies, and staying at a healthy weight are important.   On the other hand, long-term use of oral contraceptives (birth control pills), use of intrauterine (IUD) devices, having multiple full-term pregnancies, and being younger than 17-years of age with your first full-term pregnancy are factors that can negatively affect your chances of getting cervical cancer. It is important to become educated about cervical cancer prevention and consult with your healthcare provider about what is right for you.

For more information on Cervical Cancer Prevention, including information on low cost or reduced-cost medical care, visit the Morris Somerset Regional Chronic Disease Coalition at www.co.somerset.nj.us/health

The Morris-Somerset Regional Chronic Disease Coalition is made possible by a grant from the New Jersey Office of Cancer Control and Prevention and is administered by the Somerset County Department of Health.

To stay up to date with Somerset County events and information, sign up for free email alerts at www.co.somerset.nj.us/subscribe or follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

NJ Poison Control Center Poison Prevention Week Video Contest

The New Jersey Poison Control Center is happy to announce the second annual National Poison Prevention Week Video Contest. This contest is open to all New Jersey residents from Kindergarten through 12th grade. Please forward this email/attachment to anyone who might be interested in participating in the contest.

All videos should be no longer than 2 minutes and should educate the public about the dangers of poisons and communicates ways we can all take responsibility for preventing poisonings while promoting the national poison helpline. All submissions should be submitted through the national contest website by January 15, 2020. Contest rules and submission requirements can be found through the official contest website; https://nationalpoisonpreventionweek.submittable.com/submit/147044/national-poison-prevention-week-video-contest.

All questions regarding this contest should be directed to the national organizers (call: 419-534-4700|email:poisonprevention@glm.com).

If you have an event coming up, would like to plan a program, or have any questions about National Poison Prevention Week/poison education in New Jersey please contact health education specialist, Danielle Bartsche (drb144@njms.rutgers.edu).

Thank you and GOOD LUCK!
The Public Education Department at the New Jersey Poison Center