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Flu Season is here – Did you get your flu shot yet?

Flu Season is here – Did you get your flu shot yet?

 

Free Flu Vaccination Clinic

Thursday, December 14, 5PM to 8PM, Otto Kaufman Community Center

 Vaccinating ages 4 to 104 (under 18 must be accompanied by parent)  

Walk-ins are welcome, but for faster service, make an appointment.  Call the Health Department at 908-359-8211, x 227 or email health@twp.montgomery.nj.us

It’s time to share– time with family, presents—and germs! Protect your family from the flu, in time for the Holidays!

The Centers for Disease Control recommends vaccination against influenza for all people over 6 months of age.  The flu shot protects you and those around you.  Flu can be especially serious in seniors, young children, pregnant women, and people with conditions like asthma and diabetes.

The Health Department is giving the quadrivalent flu vaccine which does not contain preservatives, including thimerosal. The vaccine is called quadrivalent because it offers protection against four different  flu virus strains that research shows will be most common during this flu season: two influenza A virus strains and two influenza B virus strains.

The flu shot is Free to residents of Montgomery, and the Boroughs of Hopewell, Pennington, and Rocky Hill; first responders; Municipal/District employees, and Medicare recipients.  Free-will donations accepted.

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Public Hearing to Prevent Youth Access to Electronic Smoking Devices in Town

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Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention

Grandparents Guide to Lead Poisoning

Parents Guide to Lead Poisoning Prevention for Vegetarians

Sources of Lead Poisoning

Lead Poisoning and Remodeling the Older Home

       1. Carpet Removal

       2. Exterior Paint

       3. Interior Lead Paint

       4. Lead Disposal

       5. Lead in Soil

       6. Lead Testing

      7. Replacing Doors and Window Trims 

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Increase in Foodborne Illnesses

Montgomery Twp. – The Health Department has seen an increase in the number of foodborne illnesses in our area, especially over the past month. Foodborne illnesses like E. coli, Salmonella, Giardiasis, and Campylobacter can pose serious health risks and may take several weeks to treat. Spoiled food can make a person sick any day of the year, but warm weather and summer barbeque picnics make the problem more common. According to Stephanie Carey, Montgomery Township Health Officer, “we are seeing a rising number of food-related illnesses for a few reasons – bacteria grows rapidly in warm and humid settings, and preparing food and eating outdoors makes it harder to follow simple safety rules”.

“When we see increased incidences of foodborne illnesses, we investigate each case separately, looking for trends that may link two or more cases together.  However, we often find that summer is the peak season for foodborne-related illnesses due to vacations, travel, and grilling or eating outdoors,” says Brianna Retsis, the Township’s Public Health Nurse.  “Health Education is key to preventing the spread of these illnesses that are mostly spread by the oral-fecal route. Simple measures, such as proper handwashing, and food-handling techniques can prevent foodborne illness, or food poisoning.

Signs and Symptoms of Foodborne Illness include:

§  Abdominal Cramps §  Weight Loss
§  Nausea/Vomiting §  Weakness/Fatigue
§  Severe (often bloody) Diarrhea §  Loss of Appetite
§  Fever §  Headache

The Health Department encourages four simple food safety tips:

  1. Wash hands and surfaces often. Unwashed hands are a prime cause of foodborne illness.  Hands should be washed with warm, soapy water before and after handling food.
  2. Don’t cross-contaminate. Separate raw meats and uncooked food from ready-to-eat food.
  3. Cook to proper temperatures. Cooking at high enough temperatures will kill harmful bacteria that cause foodborne illness.
  4. Refrigerate promptly. Food left out of refrigeration for more than 2 hours may not be safe to eat.

For more information:

USDA: www.FoodSafety.gov

Fight BAC: www.fightbac.org/summer-1/

For questions or more information, please contact the Montgomery Township Health Department at (908) 359-8211

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Prevent Lyme Disease Press Release

May is Tick-borne Disease Awareness Month

Montgomery Twp., NJ — A growing number of Montgomery Twp. Residents are falling ill with diseases spread by ticks, such as Lyme disease and anaplasmosis. These tick-borne diseases are preventable if you take action to stay safe while enjoying the outdoors now, and in the warmer months ahead.

In New Jersey, the most commonly infected tick is the deer tick (or black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis). “After a mild winter, tick populations are surging and that could mean a bad year for Lyme Disease. During the spring, ticks are active and looking to feed on people or pets. The trouble is, these ticks can be as small as a poppy seed, so we all need to be aware of the risks and take action to protect ourselves.” said Stephanie Carey, Health Officer for Montgomery Twp. Health Department.

Anyone who is bitten by a tick carrying the bacteria can become infected. People who spend a lot of time outdoors in tick-infested areas from April through October are at greatest risk. Proper removal of a tick from the skin within 48 hours of being bitten can reduce the risk of infection.

The Health Department encourages residents to follow these three simple steps to avoid tick-borne diseases:

REPEL – Before you go outside, apply an EPA-registered insect repellent (such as DEET). Treat your clothes with permethrin. Wear light-colored long sleeved shirts and long pants, and tuck your pants into your socks. Inspect yourself regularly when outside to catch any ticks before they attach.

INSPECT – Do daily tick checks on yourself, your children and pets. Check yourself from head to toe.

REMOVE – Remove ticks promptly. Showering within two hours of coming indoors is also effective to wash ticks off the skin.

If you were bitten by a tick – watch for early signs of disease during the weeks following the bite. The first sign of Lyme disease is often an expanding red rash at the site of the tick bite. The rash usually appears seven to 14 days after the tick bite, but sometimes it takes up to 30 days to appear. Not everyone gets the rash, so be on the lookout for additional symptoms of early Lyme disease: fatigue, headache, fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, and muscle and joint pain. Early signs of anaplasmosis are fever, muscle pain and malaise. Both diseases can be successfully treated with antibiotics, especially if treatment is given early.

Get more tips and information for reducing your risk of tick bites, download tick-identification cards, see how to safely remove a tick, at health.montgomery.nj.us.

For health news, alerts and information – visit www.health.montgomery.nj.us or call (908) 359-8211.

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May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month

The Montgomery Township Health Department and the Morris-Somerset Regional Chronic Disease Coalition (RCDC), along with its partners, are encouraging residents to play it safe and protect themselves from the harmful rays of the sun, beginning this season and throughout the year.

A proclamation declaring May as Skin Cancer Awareness month was presented at the April 25 Somerset County freeholders’ meeting.

“Skin cancer is the most common of all cancers. It is vital that we understand that anyone can get skin cancer regardless of skin color or age,” said Freeholder Patricia L. Walsh, public health and safety liaison. “Recent studies indicate that sun damage in childhood can lead to skin cancer later in life, so you are never too young to protect yourself from sun exposure.”

“Skin cancer is a serious public health concern.  Every year, more than five million Americans are treated for skin cancer. This year alone, more than 10,000 deaths in the U.S. will be caused by melanoma skin cancer,” she said.  “We are urging residents to avoid artificial tanning, to conduct self-exams and to get screened. Melanoma is highly treatable when caught early.”

The RCDC is encouraging skin cancer awareness through a number of initiatives, programs and screenings throughout both counties.  An interactive May skin cancer awareness calendar with sun safety tips, screening locations and partner resources is available at http://bit.ly/MelanomaHD.  Dates with an orange star open to tips on how to protect yourself and your family as well as screening information and available resources.

An information table with skin cancer resources, screening information and copies of the calendar will be in the lobby of the Somerset County Administration Building at 20 Grove St., Somerville throughout the month of May. For ongoing information about programs offered by the Somerset County Department of Health, go to http://bit.ly/SCHealthDept and follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SCHealthDept.

We also are supporting our coalition partner the Enright Melanoma Foundation, a New Jersey-based nonprofit organization, whose mission is to raise sun-safety awareness and help prevent melanoma through education and early detection.

Residents are encouraged to become Enright Sun Safety Certified™. Designed by skin-care professionals from the Enright Melanoma Foundation, programs are free, online education courses for ages 5 and over that take about 15 minutes to complete.  Once finished a certificate of completion can be printed. The programs can be found at www.ApplyCoverEnjoy.org.

The Morris-Somerset Regional Chronic Disease Coalition, under the auspices of the Somerset County Department of Health, is made possible by a grant from the New Jersey Office of Cancer Control and Prevention.  For more information, to become a member or to learn more about available cancer resources, screening locations, dates, times and eligibility, contact RCDC Public Health Consultant Lucille Y-Talbot at (908) 203-6077, ytalbot@co.somerset.nj.us or visit http://bit.ly/RCDCSC.

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In the Blink of an Eye: A Conversation about Stress, Anxiety, Drugs & Alcohol in our Community

In the Blink of an Eye – Thursday, April 20, 2017. 

A Conversation about Stress, Anxiety, Drugs & Alcohol in our Community

 

Join the Conversation! 

Submit your question for our panel: http://www.mtsd.k12.nj.us/blink 

Panel includes:

  • Moderator – School District Superintendent Nancy Gartenberg
  • Captain Thomas Wain (Montgomery Township Police Department)
  • Dr. Bert Mandelbaum (Montgomery Township School District Physician)
  • Somerset County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Experts and Advocates from the Recovery Community

Community Faith Leaders, Mental Health providers and Community Partners will also be available to answer any of your questions or requests for additional support and resources. 

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March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Calendar

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, colorectal cancer affects both men and women, is the second leading cancer-related killer in the United States and is the third most common cancer in men and women, but it is preventable and outcomes are better when cancer is found at an early stage.

Several screening methods are available, including take-home options. Many public and private insurance plans cover colorectal cancer screening and local resources are available to help people who are uninsured.

The Morris-Somerset Regional Chronic Disease Coalition (RCDC) is encouraging residents to add fiber-rich foods to their diet through its “Fiber Matters: Fiber Fridays” initiative by designating Fridays during March as a jumping-off point to a more healthful lifestyle. For additional information on free educational programs offered in both counties during the month of March, contact RCDC Coordinator Lucille Talbot at (908) 203-6077 or ytalbot@co.somerset.nj.us.

Somerset County residents can learn if they are eligible for low-cost or reduced-cost medical care, including exams and screenings, by calling Zufall Health Center in Somerville (hablamos espanol) at (908) 526-2335.