Public Hearing Post 2

Upcoming Public Hearing to Prevent Youth Access to Electronic Smoking Devices in Town

Nov. 29 Public Hearing to Prevent Youth Access to Electronic Smoking Devices in Town                                           
What is it? Why is it important to you?

E-Cigarettes Background and Proposed Ordinance  

Public Hearing Flyer

Resources

 

Public Hearing Post 2

Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention

Grandparents Guide to Lead Poisoning

Parents Guide to Lead Poisoning Prevention for Vegetarians

Sources of Lead Poisoning

Lead Poisoning and Remodeling the Older Home

       1. Carpet Removal

       2. Exterior Paint

       3. Interior Lead Paint

       4. Lead Disposal

       5. Lead in Soil

       6. Lead Testing

      7. Replacing Doors and Window Trims 

fluclinic

Fall Flu Clinic Dates

Fall Flu Clinics
Vaccinating ages 4 to 104
More clinics for your convenience!

Montgomery Township
Wednesdays, October 4, 11, & 18th
Otto Kaufman Community Center
356 Skillman Rd.
Skillman, NJ 08558

Oct. 4th Time: 9:00 AM to 1:00PM & 6:00-8:00 PM

Oct. 11th Time: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Oct. 18th Time: 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Pennington Borough Hall: Wed. October 18th, 6:00PM-8:00PM

Hopewell Borough Hall: Tues. November 7 “Vote & Vax”
9:00am-3:00pm & 5:00-8:00pm

Rocky Hill Borough Hall Tues. October 24th, 1:00pm-3:00 pm

To reserve your shot:

• E-mail health@twp.montgomery.nj.us with your name, address, birth date, age, Medicare number and phone number

OR

• Call the Health Department at 908-359-8211

The flu shot is Free to Seniors with Medicare, $25 for non-Medicare.

Public Hearing Post 2

Chronic Disease Self-Management Program @ Library

Do you or someone you know have a chronic health condition?

Those dealing with managing diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, hepatitis, hypertension, Lyme, cancer, COPD, or any other chronic conditions… Take Control of Your Health is the right choice!

6 Free Sessions
Wednesdays at 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM
Beginning October 25th

Mary Jacobs Library
64 Washington St.
Rocky Hill, NJ

More details in PDF at:

Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Flyer

Register at this Google Form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe_AkaWDFJKV0KZtsysmg3HsbNu0rOtT14GMe2HSpsFOpUxaQ/viewform

Public Hearing Post 2

Increase in Foodborne Illnesses

Montgomery Twp. – The Health Department has seen an increase in the number of foodborne illnesses in our area, especially over the past month. Foodborne illnesses like E. coli, Salmonella, Giardiasis, and Campylobacter can pose serious health risks and may take several weeks to treat. Spoiled food can make a person sick any day of the year, but warm weather and summer barbeque picnics make the problem more common. According to Stephanie Carey, Montgomery Township Health Officer, “we are seeing a rising number of food-related illnesses for a few reasons – bacteria grows rapidly in warm and humid settings, and preparing food and eating outdoors makes it harder to follow simple safety rules”.

“When we see increased incidences of foodborne illnesses, we investigate each case separately, looking for trends that may link two or more cases together.  However, we often find that summer is the peak season for foodborne-related illnesses due to vacations, travel, and grilling or eating outdoors,” says Brianna Retsis, the Township’s Public Health Nurse.  “Health Education is key to preventing the spread of these illnesses that are mostly spread by the oral-fecal route. Simple measures, such as proper handwashing, and food-handling techniques can prevent foodborne illness, or food poisoning.

Signs and Symptoms of Foodborne Illness include:

§  Abdominal Cramps §  Weight Loss
§  Nausea/Vomiting §  Weakness/Fatigue
§  Severe (often bloody) Diarrhea §  Loss of Appetite
§  Fever §  Headache

The Health Department encourages four simple food safety tips:

  1. Wash hands and surfaces often. Unwashed hands are a prime cause of foodborne illness.  Hands should be washed with warm, soapy water before and after handling food.
  2. Don’t cross-contaminate. Separate raw meats and uncooked food from ready-to-eat food.
  3. Cook to proper temperatures. Cooking at high enough temperatures will kill harmful bacteria that cause foodborne illness.
  4. Refrigerate promptly. Food left out of refrigeration for more than 2 hours may not be safe to eat.

For more information:

USDA: www.FoodSafety.gov

Fight BAC: www.fightbac.org/summer-1/

For questions or more information, please contact the Montgomery Township Health Department at (908) 359-8211

Mushroom

Mushroom Poisonings

NJ Poison Center Sees a Spike in Mushroom Poisoning
Don’t be the Next Case

August 3, 2017 Warning: Never eat wild mushrooms whether growing in your garden, on your lawn or in the wild!

15 cases since July 24, 2017
Ages of patients: 15 months to 75 years old

Several of these cases have resulted in hospitalizations with potentially life-threatening consequences. No matter the scenario, picking wild mushrooms is dangerous and risky.

Many edible mushrooms have toxic “look-a-likes.” Eating even a few bites of certain mushrooms can cause severe illness. Some symptoms of mushroom poisoning include intense vomiting and diarrhea, dehydration, damage to vital organs like the liver and even death.

“Picking and eating wild mushrooms can be a dangerous game”, says Dr. Diane Calello, Medical Director of the NJ Poison Center, Rutgers NJ Medical School. “Even those who think they can identify a toxic mushroom can be fooled”.

Experienced mushroom pickers are even wrong sometimes, so we urge you to take this warning seriously. Online mushroom identification sites can be falsely reassuring. Parents must teach their children to never put wild plants, berries, nuts, or mushrooms into their mouths. Remember, your family pets are highly susceptible to mushroom poisoning as well.

If an exposure should occur, do not take a chance by waiting until symptoms appear or wasting time looking up information on the Internet. Time is of the essence especially when it comes to mushroom poisoning. If someone is unconscious, not breathing, seizing, difficult to wake up, etc. call 9-1-1 immediately, otherwise call the NJ Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222.

Calling the poison center is always the fastest way to get the medical help or information you need. The poison center will arrange for an expert to identify the mushroom and the center can then provide advice on management depending on the mushroom’s identification.

Remember to:

• Remove any remaining parts of the mushroom from the victim’s mouth and place those fragments and all mushrooms that are in the immediate vicinity of the incident into one or more paper bags (NOT plastic!).
• Take a digital photograph of the mushroom(s) in question. It helps to take a picture of the mushroom next to other objects such as a coin, ruler, etc. to provide a sense of scale.

Call to action: Be prepared for any emergency – keep the Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222) handy by saving it as a contact in your phone.

Help is Just a Phone Call Away!

We are social. Join us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/njpies) and Twitter (@NJPoisonCenter) for breaking news, safety tips, trivia questions, etc.

Real People. Real Answers.

just-shot-glass-1

Parents Who Host, Lose The Most

Don’t be a party to teenage drinking

This time of year brings lots of opportunities for teens to celebrate.  Unfortunately, many times these celebrations end in tragedy because the parties are fueled by alcohol provided by adults.  This year, the Montgomery-Rocky Hill Municipal Alliance wants teens (and their parents) to celebrate events safely without alcohol.

Now through July, the Montgomery Township Police Department and the Montgomery-Rocky Hill Municipal Alliance are raising awareness about the health and safety risks of adults serving alcohol at teen parties.

“Too many people think underage drinking is harmless or even worse – it is acceptable if parents take car keys away from youth.  Every year we hear about teens dying or suffering from alcohol poisoning, sexual assault, cyber bullying and drowning that occur after adults provide alcohol to youth.” said Devangi Patel, Montgomery Rocky-Hill Municipal Alliance Coordinator. “Nobody has the right to endanger the welfare of someone else’s child by providing them with alcohol”, she added.

“The Montgomery Township Police Department takes underage drinking and the adults who sell or serve alcohol to youth very seriously”, said Captain Thomas Wain, Montgomery Township Police Department.  Anyone who purposely or knowingly offers, serves or makes available an alcoholic beverage to a person under the legal age for consuming alcoholic beverages or entices or encourages that person to drink an alcoholic beverage is a disorderly person, he warned.

“Underage drinking is illegal, has long term health consequences and is a factor in all five of the leading causes of death among youth” explained Patel.  We want this to be a happy commencement season, underage drinking isn’t part of that picture, she added.

Parents should understand that taking away the car keys does not solve all of the problems related to underage drinking.

Did you know:

  • At least six youth under 21 die every day from non-driving alcohol related causes (such as
    alcohol poisoning, falls, burns, drowning, homicide and suicide).
  • Youth aged 12-20 drink 11% of all alcohol consumed in the U.S.
  • Studies reveal that alcohol consumption by adolescents impairs intellectual development and results in possibly permanent brain damage.
  • When drinking is delayed until age 21, a child’s risk of serious alcohol problems decreased by 70%.
  • A conviction for underage drinking goes on your permanent criminal record and will appear on criminal background checks performed by educational institutions and employers.

Consequences of Underage Drinking.  Youth who drink alcohol are more likely to experience:

·   Poor coping skills

·   Legal problems, such as arrests, abuse/assaults and drunk driving

·   Poor decision making

·   Disruption of normal growth and sexual development

·   Alcohol-related car crashes and other unintentional injuries, such as burns, falls, and drowning

·   Abuse of other drugs

·   Death from alcohol poisoning

·   Unwanted, unplanned, and unprotected sexual activity

·   Physical and sexual assault

·   Higher risk for suicide

·   Memory problems

·   Changes in brain development that may have life-long effects.

·   School problems, such as higher absence and poor grades

In general, the risk of youth experiencing these problems is especially greater for those who binge drink.

Here are some tips for adults (especially parents) on how to avoid being a party to teenage drinking:

  • Don’t be afraid to be the bad guy. Taking a tough stand on alcohol use can help youth say no when they are pressured to drink by their friends.
  • Talk with other adults about hosting alcohol-free youth events.  Unity creates a tough, enforceable message.
  • Communication and honesty are important to keep your child safe. Tell your teen that you expect him/her not to use alcohol or other drugs at parties. Be up to greet your teen when s/he comes home. This can be a good way to check the time and talk about the evening.
  • Parent networking is the best prevention tool to combat underage drinking. Get to know your teen’s friends and their parents. If your teen is planning on going to a party, call the parents to ensure that they will be home and that they will not allow drugs or alcohol.
  • Set a positive example. If hosting a party, always serve alternative non-alcoholic beverages and do not let anyone drink and drive.
  • Stay home if your teen is hosting a party at home. Observe the activities and confiscate any alcohol that may be brought by party goers.
  • Report underage drinking to the police promptly.
  • Encourage parents and youth to call 9-11 if someone needs medical help resulting from binge drinking or alcohol poisoning. New Jersey’s Lifeline Legislation protects the caller from prosecution (P.L. 2009, c.133).

For more information, please contact the Montgomery Township Health Department at (908) 359-8211.